Tag Archives: Technology PR

We’re delighted that we’ve done it again. At one of the industry’s biggest and most respected awards ceremonies, Dynamo was up against 10 of the biggest and best technology PR companies, but walked on stage to pick up the coveted gold award for our work within the technology PR sector.

This is a testament to the way we work, as much as the work we do.

We’ve built up world class expertise in sectors including edutech, 3D printing, AI and ML – from early work with clients like SwiftKey, through to more recent clients that are breaking technology barriers like Speechmatics. We’ve opened up an office in Silicon Valley to better support our North American clients, and help with crowdfunding campaigns on Kickstarter and Indiegogo.

And whilst our creativity has also won awards (the successful hijacking of the Rio Olympics in the Athletes Abstinence campaign for instance), it’s the way we work that clients also value.

We have a clear desire to influence the wider PR community through the adoption of modern, forward-thinking policies. 2016 saw our efforts reach a new high with the public release of the agency’s wage gap, the introduction of a Diversity Working Group, and even having some of the largest agencies in world consult senior management on how to implement best in class working practices.

Thank you to all our staff, and our clients, and the judges for picking us once again as Technology PR agency of the year.

Paul Cockerton
Paul Cockerton
Categories: News, tags:

London Games Festival, a new annual event to celebrate the games industry’s huge cultural and economic impact right here in London, hosted a Virtual Reality Summit this week.

I was on the ground listening to speakers talk about all things VR – everything from how games, film and VFX collide, to how developers work behind the scenes to create amazing VR, to the challenges we face with the ever-growing VR market.

Here are my five key takeaways from the first ever London Games Festival VR Summit:

VR is big business – and will get bigger

More than $250million was invested in software alone from VCs to the VR industry in 2015. China is a market to watch as its games market is already worth 22 billion dollars, and large Chinese companies are getting in on the VR game which we will be able to tap into. However, VR brands and companies need to think about the end experience. People will only spend money in VR if it’s on things they care as much about as the things they have in real life.

The industry must learn to share

The idea that developers must share ideas for the VR industry to progress was a key theme. “People who go it alone will fail”, states Sam Gage from previsualization company The Third Floor. People working in VR should even consider sharing their data online for those in the community to help improve on their work; solving problems that they themselves missed.

We can solve VR sickness

Queasiness is still a problem for some VR users, but there are ways this can be controlled with session length, reduced lag and expectation managing. Matthew Newcombe at Ustwo explained how when making Land’s End it was key is for the player to transport to their destination with intuitive “gaze points”. VR should feel comfortable and autonomous, as though if you want to go somewhere you can, but with gentle encouragement to stay within the right space (just as players solve puzzles in a cylinder shape in Land’s End).

Matthew Newcombe from Ustwo speaking honestly about VR development at the VR Summit

Matthew Newcombe from Ustwo speaking honestly about VR development at the VR Summit

VR is still in its infancy

NVIDIA’s Phil Scott argued that VR is not a revolution, but the start of an evolution. We haven’t had the “Mario 64” moment yet – the culturally defining peak that people resonate with. While the Sci Fi London Film Festival shared a rather dark video about how the layers of VR reality could affect us, others warned that we need to nail the basics of VR before getting too ambitious, lamented over the possibility of a VR system untethered from wires, and imagined a new kind of shared, social VR experience.

The quiet renaissance

One of the final thoughts of the day came from Herman Narula, CEO at Improbable. He talked of a subtle shift in the industry – a quiet renaissance in VR, a new freedom in making the game world come to life. VR demands new ways of telling stories from developers. Just as NVIDIA’s Everest demo is hailed as a great example of how VR can convey real experiences, developers are now having to rethink how gamers experience a narrative – how VR as a new medium can tell stories in a new language, and for a potentially new audience.

For those of you keen to explore other VR events on offer, why not head over to Bristol’s VR World Congress next week, Storytelling in VR on 26 April or VRX in London next month, to name a few.

Dynamo Team
Dynamo Team
Categories: Opinion, tags: ,

IFA sometimes feels like Groundhog Day. The beginning of September always brings with it a wave of new consumer technology product launches and clearing up rumours, which makes it a busy time for tech fans, allowing IFA, Europe’s largest consumer electronics exhibition and the smaller cousin to CES in Las Vegas, to dominate global tech news during this time.

As electronics companies wrestle to position their products in the forefront of consumers minds, here’s a quick roundup for those who didn’t quite convince their boss to book them a flight to Berlin.

Advancement in 4K

Moving beyond your television, 4K is now becoming the next big thing in smartphone technology.

With Sony showing off their new line of Xperia Z5 smartphones, of which there are three, the Z5 Premium boasts an eye-watering 4K (3840×2160) screen for those times that you really want to show off your ludicrously high definition screen to friends and family. Are they waterproof you ask? Why yes, yes they are.

Wearable technology still a safe bet

With exciting new smartwatches being announced from the likes of ASUS, Motorola and Huawei, the name of the game this year is having a round face and a more luxurious quality.

Samsung show a clear step forward with their seventh version of a smartwatch Samsung Gear S2. Allowing for a round display and two models, Samsung is trying to punch with the likes of Apple in the space which might prove difficult as the Apple Watch was highly prominent on the wrists of those attending.

While you were sleeping

One trend that is appearing at IFA this year is the use of technology to track your sleeping patterns by placing devices in bed with you and watching you sleep (ala the Samsung SleepSense).

SevenHugs is a good example of this new trend as they are showcasing their hugOne device that allows the entire family to monitor their nightly escapades, humidity, temperature, and air quality.  The hugOne then gives the user a clear tracking method to move users to a informative and restful nights sleep.

Who took home the prize?

While Sony dominated conversations in the Press Room with their Z5 Premium phone, it was Apple who took the prize even though they don’t have a presence at IFA, as talk of their upcoming announcement next was the topic of choice.

This might be an indicator of the what people thought of the large announcements this year, and perhaps the word “lackluster” was used in various conversations, but it seems although Apple might not attend IFA, they don’t have to in order to be news.

Dynamo Team
Dynamo Team
Categories: Opinion, tags: ,

Taking place in Los Angeles, the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) is the world’s premier trade show for the games industry. This year over 52,000 people attended – even Kanye West made an appearance (playing Street Fighter V behind a privacy screen, so I’m told).

Blockbuster game announcements included Fallout 4, Halo 5, Uncharted 4, Lara Croft’s next adventure and a new game in the Gears of War franchise. Design led games include Unravel, Abzu, The Last Guardian. And for a dose of nostalgia, it was all about the Final Fantasy 7 remake.

I was on the show floor checking out the best that the industry had to offer, with a team supporting from our UK HQ. Here are some of the top trends we spotted this year.

Virtual Reality

Microsoft had previously revealed an Oculus Rift tie-up and at E3 they announced a Valve partnership, meaning its HTC Vive VR headset will work on Windows 10. The company also revealed a new live demo of its Hololens augmented reality headset running Minecraft.

Everyone from Paper Crane in the Indie Cade area (a section of the showfloor showcasing indie games) to our client FOVE, who were showing off their eye-tracking VR technology, show that that fans are eager for an immersive gaming experience and see if it lives up to the hype.

May the E3 force be with you

Star Wars fans – which includes most of the Dynamo office – were finally able to see the long awaited Star Wars Battlefront gameplay footage.

EA demoed the Battle of Hoth, available November 17 (one month before the new Star Wars film debuts in cinemas). You can play as Luke and Darth Vader among other Star Wars characters, and gamers will be pleased to see that it actually looks damn pretty good.

Release date anticipation

Sony announced a remake of Final Fantasy 7 with no actual release date, Uncharted 4 and The Last Guardian have long awaited launches, and some were even shown for the second year running at E3 with no nearby official release.

This approach which was more prevalent in 2015 gives game developers a chance to get it right and give fans what they want.

Power to the creative gamer

With PC gaming and its penchant for user-created content on the rise, this year we saw its impact spread to other platforms.

LittleBigPlanet developer Media Molecule revealed Dreams, and Bethesda is offering more scope for user mods after the success of Skyrim (cheeeese?). Other games include GTA V, Fallout and Doom.

On the consumer side is Nintendo’s Mario Maker, where I created my own 2D levels in the style of various titles from across the series’ history. Our client Bloxels also demoed their “build your own videogame” Kickstarter project.

Making gaming more inclusive

Horizon and ReCore featured female protagonists in their debut trailers, Assassin’s Creed Syndicate and Dishonored 2 now have female protagonists too.

EA, as well as revealing that the new FIFA 14 release will have “interception intelligence” to improve gameplay mechanics, also announced in a first for the soccer franchise that there would be female teams.

To many this is a welcome change, showing that the industry is moving in right direction and opening gameplay out to become more inclusive.

So who won?

There are a ton of articles as to who “won”  E3 and it is reckoned to be one of the strongest E3s in quite a bit. In my view, it is ultimately the gamers who won, after all we all want to engage and excite them.  A great tool we use for some of our clients is Brandwatch, and here is its analysis looking at social to find E3’s winner.

Dynamo Team
Dynamo Team
Categories: Opinion, tags: ,

Last night we walked away with two PRMoment awards for Best Small Agency of the Year and Media Relations Campaign of the Year.

Competing against over 600 entries, we were shortlisted for nine awards for our work on smash hit Kickstarter M3D and the Bathrooms.com ‘BathroomSweets’ campaign, as well as for best agency categories.

It’s a great achievement to be awarded for our work in both the media relations category as well as consultancy, proving our creativity and expertise to deliver truly global campaigns.

Dynamo helped M3D raise more than $3.2 million on Kickstarter last year, allowing 3D printer The Micro to go into production. By pre-briefing journalists with their very own Micro 3D print, coverage secured on the day of the Kickstarter launch included Mail Online, Engadget, Mashable, and TechCrunch, just to name a few.

This latest award represents the second year running Dynamo has picked up honours at the PRMoment awards, previously the Golden Hedgehogs – last year winning Consumer PR Campaign of the Year for Making 3Doodler TIME Magazine’s invention of 2013.

Finally, a special shout out to #TheDress (our Mobile team moved fast to get hold of it last week, for Mail Online). Having worn it last night to attend the awards, we can confirm that the black and blue vs white and gold debate is still very much alive!

Dynamo Team
Dynamo Team
Categories: News, tags:

ChapStick: check. Cold and flu tablets: check. A comfy pair of shoes: check.

As a CES virgin, I did my research before flying out to Sin City and arrived prepared.

But Las Vegas’ Consumer Electronics Show (CES to you and I) only becomes real once you’ve queued for 20 minutes and your press pass is around your neck.

So, this is what I learned from this year’s show: 

  1. Drones are taking over the world

For the very first year, CES had a dedicated area for ‘Unmanned Systems’, featuring drones in every shape and size; remote-controlled, autonomous, selfie-taking – you name it, there was a drone for it. I was fortunate enough to visit the Nevada desert with our client Hexo+, the world’s first self-flying camera, which was competing with AirDog, both autonomous drones, controlled via a smartphone and Bluetooth GPS, making drone filming and flying accessible for everyone.

  1. Kickstarter projects are on the rise

From crowdfunded drones, to smart inner-soles, to electric skateboards, there was a noticeable number of Kickstarter and Indiegogo stickers on company booths this year, promoting how they had launched their products, or if in prototype stage were planning to launch them. Indiegogo even manned its own stand this year, showcasing successful projects.

  1. Car tech is accelerating

Traditionally the biggest stands at CES are the largest tech companies but you certainly couldn’t miss seeing something automotive technology-related at this year’s show. BMW’s i3 electric cars displayed how they can find a parking space by themselves, while Audi’s autonomous A7 roamed the streets, and Ford announced a number of smartcar initiatives.

  1. Sony is in action mode

Is Apple planning a wearable camera? Who knows, but Sony could be one step ahead with its 4K handheld action cam offering. Sony had a big celebrity win through legendary skateboarder Tony Hawk unveiling its slick-looking water/shock/freeze-proof GoPro rival, which got the media seriously talking.

  1. Wearable tech is becoming more fashionable

Designs of many smartwatches have remained the same, however the Withings Activité Pop caught my eye, and was descried by TechCrunch as “one of the best-designed activity trackers to ever come to market”. Jaybird’s Reign is also very slick, but if you are more concerned about your pet’s health then perhaps you should invest in a FitBark, which tracks your dog’s fitness. Woof woof.

Despite some disappointment over no major announcements from the likes of Samsung, the forward-thinking innovation revealed by new start-ups on the scene and the large car manufacturers made CES 2015 a worthwhile visit, and the ultimate tech-filled start to 2015.

Dynamo Team
Dynamo Team
Categories: Opinion, tags: ,

Dynamo has 20 years experience working for hardware, OS, network and application providers globally. Current projects include launching innovative iPhone apps, promoting phone based tech for TV brands, and targeting mobile users for blue chip brands.

Dynamo Team
Dynamo Team
Categories: Opinion, tags: ,

Having launched everything from Wii’s to SatNav’s in the last 10 years, Dynamo has recently been promoting remote control wands, and is working on launching innovative board games, as well as representing the UK’s largest gadget news and reviews site.

Dynamo Team
Dynamo Team
Categories: Opinion, tags: ,